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Disclosures

Disclosures - Sixth Edition

As a provider accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME), the American Society of Hematology must ensure balance, independence, objectivity, and scientific rigor in all of the educational ac- tivities it sponsors. All authors are expected to disclose any financial relationships with any proprietary entity producing health care goods or services that have occurred within 24 months from the start of or during the production of the work and that are relevant to the author’s content. If an au- thor has such a financial interest, then she or he must dis- close the name of the commercial interest and nature of the relationship (eg, consultant, grantee, etc.). An author who has no such financial relationship must declare that she or he has nothing to disclose. The intent of this disclosure is not to prevent an author with a significant financial or other relationship from making a presentation, but rather to pro- vide readers with information that they can use to make their own judgments. It remains for the audience to determine whether the author’s interests or relationships may influence the work with regard to exposition or conclusion.

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Disclosures of financial relationships

Chapter 1, Molecular basis of hematology
Laura Schuettpelz declares no competing financial interest. Omar Abdel-Wahab declares no competing financial interest.

Chapter 2, Consultative hematology I: hospital-based and selected outpatient topics
Cindy Neunert: safety advisory board: Genzyme. Anita Rajasekhar: consultancy: Alexion, Octapharma, Bayer, Baxter; funding: American Society of Hematology.

Chapter 3, Consultative hematology II: women’s health issues
Margaret V. Ragni: research support from Alnylam, ATHN, Baxalta, Biogen, CSL Behring, Dimension, Genentech Roche, Novo Nordisk, Novartis, Opko, Pfizer, Shire, SPARK, and Vascular Medicine Institute; consultant for Baxter , Bio-Marin, Biogen, Medscape, Opko, Tacere Therapeutics; member of the National Hemophilia Foundation Medical &Scientific Advisory Committee and a member of the Foundation for Women and Girls with Blood Disorders Advisory Board. Peter A. Kouides: consultant for Baxter, CSL Behring, Grifols; member of the National Blood Clot Alliance Medical& Scientific Advisory Board. Sarah H. O’Brien: research support from Bayer and the Hemophilia Thrombosis and Hemostasis Research Society of North America (HTRS); member of an advisory board for GlaxoSmithKline.

Chapter 4, Hematopoietic growth factors
Aaron T. Gerds declares no competing financial interest. Alan E. Lichtin declares no competing financial interest.

Chapter 5, Iron metabolism, iron overload, and the porphyrias
Heather A. Leitch has received honoraria, research funding, and/or served on advisory boards for Alexion, Apo-Pharma, Celgene, and Novartis. She is a member of the Exjade speakers’ bureau. Jecko Thachil declares no competing financial interest.

Chapter 6, Acquired underproduction anemias
Siobán B. Keel declares no competing financial interest. Narla Mohandas declares no competing financial interest.

Chapter 7, Hemolytic anemias
Farzana A. Sayani declares no competing financial interest. Sophie Lanzkron: research funding: Novartis, Glycomimetics, Emmaus.

Chapter 8, Thrombosis and thrombophilia
David Garcia: consultancy: Bristol-Myers Squibb, Portola, Pfizer, Boehringer Ingelheim, and Daiichi Sankyo. Saskia Middeldorp: consulting fees from Bayer, Boehringer Ingelheim, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Pfizer, and Daiichi Sankyo and research support from GlaxoSmithKline, Aspen, the allianceof Bristol-Myers Squibb and Pfizer, and Sanquin Blood Supply. Anjali Alatkar Sharathkumar: consulting fees from Baxter, CSL Behring, and Biogen Idec.

Chapter 9, Bleeding disorders
Christine L. Kempton: consultancy: Baxter Healthcare, BiogenIdec, Kedrion Biopharma; research support: Novo Nordisk. Jorge A. Di Paola: Consultancy: CSL Behring; DSMB Pfizer.

Chapter 10, Disorders of platelet number and function
Adam Cuker: consultancy: Amgen, Bracco, Genzyme; research support: Diagnostica Stago, T2 Biosystems. Andreas Greinacher: consultancy: Bayer Healthcare, Boehringer Ingelheim, ASPEN, Instrumentation Laboratory; honoraria: Bristol Myers Squibb.

Chapter 11, Laboratory hematology
John L. Frater declares no competing financial interest. Anne M. Winkler declares no competing financial interest.

Chapter 12, Transfusion medicine
William Savage received research funding from Fresenius-Kabi. Suzanne Bakdash declares no competing financial interest.

Chapter 13, Cellular basis of hematopoiesis and stem cell transplantation
Paresh Vyas declares no competing financial interest. Aly Karsan declares no competing financial interest.

Chapter 14, Clinical hematopoietic cell transplantation
Matthew Wieduwilt: research funding: Sigma Tau. SergioA. Giralt: consultancy: Celgene; research funding: Celgene; Sanofi-Aventis; Honoraria: Celgene, Millennium, Sanofi-Aventis; speakers’ bureau: Sanofi-Aventis.

Chapter 15, Myeloid disorders and inherited marrow failure syndromes
Alison A. Bertuch: research funding: Cancer Prevention Research Institute of Texas, National Institutes of Health, American Society of Hematology. Inderjeet Dokal: research funding: MRC, Children with Cancer, Leukaemia & Lymphoma Research.

Chapter 16, Chronic myeloid leukemia and myeloproliferative neoplasms
Ruben A. Mesa: consulting: Novartis; research support: Incyte, Gilead, Genentech, CTI, Promedior, and NS Pharma. BradyL. Stein: advisory board/consulting for Incyte Corporation.

Chapter 17, Acquired marrow failure syndromes: aplastic anemia, paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria, and myelodysplastic syndromes
Phillip Scheinberg: speaker: Novartis. Amy E. DeZern: no competing financial interest. David P. Steensma: advisory board: Incyte, Novartis, Celgene, MEI Pharma, Takeda, and Genoptix.

Chapter 18, Acute myeloid leukemia
B. Douglas Smith declares no competing financial interest. Eytan M. Stein declares no competing financial interest.

Chapter 19, Acute lymphoblastic leukemia and lymphoblastic lymphoma
Mark R. Litzow: research funding from Amgen. Mats Heyman: no competing financial interest.

Chapter 20, Hodgkin lymphoma
Ann S. LaCasce: research funding: Seattle Genetics. AndreasEngert: consultancy, presentation, and research funding: Takeda and Millennium.

Chapter 21, Non-Hodgkin lymphoma
Brad Kahl: research support: Genentech and AbbVie; consultancy: Celgene, Roche, Seattle Genetics, Millennium, Infinity, and Cell Therapeutics. Greg Nowakowski: research support: Celgene and Bayer; consultancy: Celgene, Bayer, and Seattle Genetics. David Yang: no competing financial interest.

Chapter 22, Chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma
Clive S. Zent: research funding from Novartis, Biothera, GlaxoSmithKline, Genzyme, and Genentech. Timothy G. Call: no conflicts of interest to declare.

Chapter 23, Plasma cell disorders
Shaji K. Kumar: consultancy: Celgene, Millennium, Onyx, Janssen, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Sanofi, and Skyline Diagnostics; research funding: Celgene, Millennium, Onyx, Janssen, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Sanofi, and Novartis. Jesús San Miguel: consultancy: Janssen, Novartis, Celgene, Millennium, Onyx, Bristol-Myers Squibb, and Sanofi.

 

Discussion of off-label drug use

In compliance with ACCME policy, the American Society of Hematology requires all authors to disclose any discussion of off-label drug use in their chapters.

Chapter 1, Molecular basis of hematology
No discussion of off-label drug use.

Chapter 2, Consultative hematology I: hospital-based and selected outpatient topics Cindy Neunert: corticosteroids and rituximab for use in thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura; antithrombin III and activated protein C for disseminated intravascular coagulation; cyclophosphamide, corticosteroids, intravenous immunoglobulin, and rituximab for catastrophic antiphospholipid antibody syndrome; corticosteroids, intravenous immunoglobulin, rituximab, and thrombopoietin receptor agonists for pediatric immune thrombocytopenia (ITP); rituximab for adult ITP; and granulocyte-stimulating factor outside of severe congenital neutropenia. Anita Rajasekhar: desmopressin for use in platelet function disorders; desmopressin, recombinant factor VIIa, prothrombin complex concentrate, activated prothrombin complex concentrate, fibrin glue, and, ε-aminocaproic acid, and tranexamic acid for use in surgical bleeding; conjugated estrogens for use in uremic bleeding; intravenous immunoglobulin and erythropoietin for use in parvovirus-associated pure red cell aplasia; angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers for use in post–renal transplant erythrocytosis; and rituximab for use in CD20+ posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder.

Chapter 3, Consultative hematology II: women’s health issues 
Margaret V. Ragni: not applicable. Peter A. Kouides: lowmolecular- weight heparin, fondaparinux, aspirin, and warfarin in pregnancy. Sarah H. O’Brien: not applicable.

Chapter 4, Hematopoietic growth factors 
Aaron T. Gerds: filgrastim in HIV. Alan E. Lichtin: epoetin alfa and darbepoetin alfa in myelodysplastic syndromes.

Chapter 5, Iron metabolism, iron overload, and the porphyrias 
Off-label use of iron chelation therapy.

Chapter 6, Acquired underproduction anemias 
No discussion of off-label drug use.

Chapter 7, Hemolytic anemias 
Rituximab, cyclophosphamide, azathioprine, mycophenolate mofetil, cyclosporine, and danazol in the treatment of autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

Chapter 8, Thrombosis and thrombophilia
No discussion of off-label drug use.

Chapter 9, Bleeding disorders
Recombinant factor VIIa for management of bleeding in hemophilia at doses and regimens that are not approved and for other off-label indications, as well as prothrombin complex concentrates for treatment of factor II and X deficiency.

Chapter 10, Disorders of platelet number and function
Desmopressin for inherited platelet function defects and uremic platelets, recombinant factor VIIa for inherited platelet function defects, rituximab for immune thrombocytopenia and thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, and fondaparinux and bivalirudin for heparin-induced thrombocytopenia.

Chapter 11, Laboratory hematology
No discussion of off-label drug use.

Chapter 12, Transfusion medicine
No discussion of off-label drug use.

Chapter 13, Cellular basis of hematopoiesis and stem cell transplantation
No discussion of off-label drug use.

Chapter 14, Clinical hematopoietic cell transplantation
Matthew Wieduwilt and Sergio A. Giralt: drug therapy for hematologic malignancies and hematopoietic cell transplantation.

Chapter 15, Myeloid disorders and inherited marrow failure syndromes
No discussion of off-label drug use.

Chapter 16, Chronic myeloid leukemia and myeloproliferative neoplasms
No discussion of off-label drug use.

Chapter 17, Acquired marrow failure syndromes: aplastic anemia, paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria, and myelodysplastic syndromes 
Phillip Scheinberg: cyclosporine, rabbit antithymocyte globulin, alemtuzumab, and cyclophosphamide. Amy E. DeZern: not applicable. David P. Steensma: eltrombopag, romiplostim, lenalidomide for non-del5q, darbepoetin, and epoetin.

Chapter 18, Acute myeloid leukemia
No discussion of off-label drug use.

Chapter 19, Acute lymphoblastic leukemia and lymphoblastic lymphoma
Mark R. Litzow and Mats Heyman: blinatumomab, dasatinib, and ponatinib.

Chapter 20, Hodgkin lymphoma
Ann S. LaCasce: rituximab for the treatment of lymphocytepredominant Hodgkin lymphoma. Andreas Engert: not applicable.

Chapter 21, Non-Hodgkin lymphoma
No discussion of off-label drug use.

Chapter 22, Chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma
Idelalisib, ibrutinib, ofatumumab, pentostatin, and cladribine.

Chapter 23, Plasma cell disorders
No discussion of off-label drug use.

 


 

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