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INSIDE BLOOD

THROMBOSIS & HEMOSTASIS

In this issue of Blood, Katona et al show that the A and B subunits of plasma factor XIII (pFXIII) bind with substantially tighter affinity than previously thought, and narrow the B subunit residues mediating this interaction to the second sushi domain.1 

CLINICAL TRIALS & OBSERVATIONS

In this issue of Blood, Jiang et al use the Oklahoma Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura-Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (TTP-HUS) Registry to demonstrate that in women with a previous history of TTP, associated with severe ADAMTS13 deficiency, the frequency of TTP recurrence is low and pregnancy outcomes are positive.1 

INSIDE BLOOD

In this issue of Blood, van der Veer et al report the negative prognostic impact of IKZF1 deletions in children with BCR-ABL1–positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), despite the use of tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) therapy.1 

INSIDE BLOOD

In this issue of Blood, Chambwe and colleagues demonstrate the presence of promoter methylation variability in diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (DLBCLs).1  This methylation variability correlates with the expression of specific genes and is associated with distinct survival following standard therapy—a finding that has numerous implications for our understanding of the pathogenesis of these tumors.

THROMBOSIS & HEMOSTASIS

In this issue of Blood, Matafonov et al demonstrate that an inhibiting monoclonal antibody against coagulation factor XII (fXII) reduces fibrin formation and platelet accumulation in a primate thrombosis model.1 

THROMBOSIS & HEMOSTASIS

In this issue of Blood, Sparkenbaugh et al identify coagulation factor Xa (FXa), the target for new protease-selective oral anticoagulants, as a crucial mediator for both coagulation abnormalities and chronic vascular inflammation that characterize sickle cell disease.1 

THROMBOSIS & HEMOSTASIS

In this issue of Blood, Feng et al shed incisive light on how recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa) corrects the bleeding defect in hemophilia.1 

BLOOD WORK

PLENARY PAPER

HOW I TREAT

CLINICAL TRIALS AND OBSERVATIONS

LYMPHOID NEOPLASIA

MYELOID NEOPLASIA

THROMBOSIS AND HEMOSTASIS

ERRATA

RETRACTIONS

  • Cover Image

    Cover Image

    issue cover

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemic (CLL) cells release HMGB1, a nuclear protein, in vivo and in vitro. Extracellular HMGB1 induces differentiation of nurse-like cells, which in turn promote CLL cell survival. This image shows that nurse-like cells were differentiated from lymph node suspension cells from a CLL patient after in vitro culture for one week. Nurse-like cells were stained with a mouse anti-CD68 (red) antibody. Nuclei for all cells were stained with both DAPI (blue) and a rabbit anti-HMGB1 (green) antibody. Some of the CLL cells showed absence of nuclear HMGB1 (blue nucleus), suggesting that HMGB1 has been released during in vitro culture which can be detected in the culture medium. See the article by Jia et al on page 1709.

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