Abstract

The effects of several commonly employed anticoagulant procedures on the specific gravity of blood and of plasma, and on the relative red cell volume, were studied in freshly drawn samples of arterial blood from rabbits. Measurements on treated blood, or its fluid component, were compared with corresponding results on portions of the same samples without treatment and prior to coagulation.

Satisfactory preservation of the specific gravity of whole blood was obtained by defibrination or by the use of ammonium-potassium oxalate mixture.

Satisfactory preservation of the specific gravity of plasma was obtained by defibrination or by the use of heparin solution.

The relative volume of red cells was essentially unaltered by the use of dry heparin, oxalate mixture, 1.6 per cent solution of potassium oxalate, or by defibrination.

Dry potassium oxalate and sodium citrate caused marked changes, increasing the specific gravity of blood and of plasma, and shrinking the red cells.

Dry heparin caused significant increases in the specific gravity of blood and of plasma.

Ammonium-potassium oxalate mixture increased the specific gravity of plasma markedly and consistently.

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