Introduction: Hemophilia A (HA) is a congenital bleeding disorder caused by a deficiency in clotting factor VIII (FVIII). There are currently limited data on the impact of HA on daily life. Here we examine the impact of HA on the daily life of adult persons with HA (PwHA) without current FVIII inhibitors according to disease severity.

Methods: The Cost of Haemophilia in Europe: a Socioeconomic Survey II (CHESS II) is a retrospective, burden-of-illness study in adults with mild, moderate, and severe HA or hemophilia B (defined by endogenous FVIII/IX [IU/dL] relative to normal; mild, 5-<40%; moderate, 1-5%; severe, <1%); this analysis includes only PwHA. Male participants (aged ≥18 years) diagnosed with HA (without FVIII inhibitors) at least 12 months prior to clinical consultation were enrolled from Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Romania, Spain, and the UK. Data on clinical outcomes and healthcare resource utilization were captured via electronic case report forms disseminated to hemophilia specialists. PwHA completed a paper-based questionnaire utilizing 5-point Likert scales to assess the disease burden on their daily life. Overall, 12 months' retrospective data were examined. Informed consent was obtained and the study was approved by the University of Chester ethical committee.

Results: Of 258 PwHA completing questionnaires, 15.9% (n=41), 27.9% (n=72), and 56.2% (n=145) had mild, moderate, and severe HA, respectively. Of those with severe HA, 60.0% were currently receiving FVIII prophylaxis (standard of care for severe HA); in comparison, 4.9% and 6.9% of those with mild and moderate HA were receiving prophylaxis (Table 1). Treatment adaptation in anticipation of physical or social activity was reported by 19.5%, 23.6%, and 38.6% of those with mild, moderate, and severe HA, respectively. Over a third of participants with mild (36.6%) and moderate (44.4%) HA, and 64.8% of those with severe HA (58.6% with severe HA receiving on-demand treatment and 69.0% receiving prophylaxis) agreed or strongly agreed that HA had reduced their physical activity (Figure 1). Overall, 38.9% of those with moderate HA and 58.6% of those with severe HA (63.8% with severe HA receiving on-demand treatment and 55.2% receiving prophylaxis) agreed or strongly agreed that their HA had reduced their social activity; this was less pronounced in mild HA (9.8%). Additionally, 31.7%, 36.1%, and 64.1% of those with mild, moderate, and severe HA (62.1% with severe HA receiving on-demand treatment and 65.5% receiving prophylaxis) agreed or strongly agreed that their HA had caused them to miss opportunities. Correspondingly, frustration due to HA was felt by 19.5%, 34.7% and 57.9% (56.9% with severe HA receiving on-demand treatment and 58.6% receiving prophylaxis) of people, respectively. When asked whether they believed their daily life was compromised due to their hemophilia, 24.4%, 37.5%, and 63.4% of those with mild, moderate, and severe HA, respectively, agreed. Pain, as reported by the physician, was noted in 36.6% of people with mild HA (100% was reported as 'mild'); in people with moderate HA, pain was reported as 'mild', 'moderate', and 'severe' in 44.4%, 20.8%, and 1.4% of PwHA, respectively. In people with severe HA, pain was reported as 'mild', 'moderate', and 'severe' in 39.7%, 27.6%, and 8.6% for those receiving on-demand treatment, and 37.9%, 32.2%, and 8.0% for those receiving prophylaxis, respectively.

Conclusions: In all disease severity groups, there was a notable group of PwHA that felt that they have had to reduce their physical and social activity, have had fewer opportunities and are frustrated due to their disease. While the impact on daily life is most pronounced in people with severe HA (including those receiving on-demand treatment and those receiving prophylaxis), it is also apparent in mild and moderate HA, indicating that there may be an unmet medical need in these groups.

Disclosures

Noone:Healthcare Decision Consultants: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Research Investigator PROBE: Research Funding; European Haemophilia Consortium: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees. Nissen:F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd: Current Employment; Actelion: Consultancy; Novartis: Research Funding; GSK: Research Funding. Xu:F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd: Current Employment, Other: All authors received support for third party writing assistance, furnished by Scott Battle, PhD, provided by F. Hoffmann-La Roche, Basel, Switzerland.. Burke:University of Chester: Current Employment; HCD Economics: Current Employment; F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd: Consultancy. Asghar:HCD Economics: Current Employment. Dhillon:F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd: Other: All authors received editorial support for this abstract, furnished by Scott Battle, funded by F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd, Basel, Switzerland. ; HCD Economics: Current Employment. Aizenas:F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd: Current Employment, Current equity holder in publicly-traded company. Meier:F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd: Current Employment, Current equity holder in publicly-traded company. O'Hara:HCD Economics: Current Employment, Current equity holder in private company; F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd: Consultancy. Khair:Biomarin: Consultancy; HCD Economics: Consultancy; Novo Nordisk: Consultancy, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Medikhair: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Sobi: Consultancy, Honoraria, Research Funding, Speakers Bureau; CSL Behring: Honoraria, Research Funding; F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd: Honoraria, Research Funding; Takeda: Honoraria, Speakers Bureau; Bayer: Consultancy, Honoraria, Speakers Bureau; Haemnet: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees.

Author notes

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Asterisk with author names denotes non-ASH members.