Abstract

Background: Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) are clonal disorders characterized by the proliferation of myeloid progenitors. A defining hallmark of MPN-associated myelofibrosis (MF) is the deposition of fibrous tissue inside the bone marrow (BM) stroma, arising either as a primary process (PMF), or secondary to the essential thromocythemia (post-ET MF) or polycythemia vera. In at least 1/3 of cases, BM fibrosis is accompanied by the osteosclerotic thickening of the bone trabeculae. It was generally held that these changes are a reaction of mesenchymal cells to the stimuli from the malignant clone. However, the recent discovery of neoplastic monocyte-derived fibrocytes capable of directly inducing BM fibrosis in situ and in vivo has led us to hypothesize that other tissue remodeling cells of the myeloid lineage may play similar roles in the pathogenesis of MPN-associated MF. Osteoclasts (OC) are giant multinuclear cells formed by the fusion of multiple monocytic progenitors. Apart from being exclusively bone-resorbing cells, OCs have a critical role in regulating bone formation by the mesenchymal cell-derived osteoblasts (OB) and maintaining the hematopoietic BM microenvironment. The aim of this study was to examine the status of these cells in MF patients and explore the effects that the neoplastic OC progenitors exert on the development of MPN-associated osteosclerosis.

Methods: In order to quantitate bone remodeling cells, trephine biopsies were obtained from patients with PMF (n = 32) and post-ET MF (n = 27), as well as healthy controls (n = 3). A tyramide signal amplification-based fluorescence IHC approach was employed using TRAP and cathepsin K as OC-specific and CD56and osterix as OB-specific markers. In addition, CD14+ low-density peripheral blood cells from the representative MF patients and healthy controls were cultured in the presence of M-CSF and RANKL. After 3 weeks mature OCs were visualized using fluorescently labeled F-actin and TRAP with DAPI as the nuclear counterstain, and the JAK2V617F allele frequency was assessed via RT-PCR. For the OC functional assay, cells were plated on a mineralized surface, which was subsequently stained using a modified von Kossa method. To assess the OC fusion capacity, two populations of progenitors labeled with different lipophilic probes were mixed in a 1:1 ratio and the colocalized signal was quantified for each mature cell. All imaging was conducted using an automated multispectral or a dual spinning disk confocal system.

Results: Based on the multiplex BM imaging analysis, we observed a significant increase in the number of OCs in MF patients compared to healthy controls (median: 21.8 vs. 7.0 per 100 mm of bone perimeter; p < 0.0001) that was followed by a substantial increase in the total number of OBs and the density of trabecular bone. After inducing differentiation of JAK2+ monocytes from MF patients into mature TRAP+ OCs in vitro, these cells consistently showed a high mutant allele frequency. Compared to OCs cultured from healthy monocytes, MF patients' OCs exhibited a 40.5% decrease in the median number of nuclei per cell (p= 0.024) and a tendency to incompletely develop F-actin rings. Simultaneously, there was no change in the mean TRAP positivity between the two groups. Finally, MF OCs were significantly less apt at resorbing mineral-coated areas in contrast to healthy cells (median: 21.5% vs. 7.3%; p= 0.016), and there was a 3-fold decrease in the proportion of fused mature OCs from MF monocytes compared to healthy ones (p= 0.008).

Conclusions: The development of OCs is highly skewed towards proliferation in both primary and secondary MPN-associated MF. We were able to demonstrate that neoplastic monocytic progenitors retain their aberrant genetic constitution even after differentiating into mature OCs. However, fusion of such progenitors seems to be profoundly impaired, and MF OCs are unable to fully acquire the phenotypical features associated with efficient bone resorption, particularly multinucleation and the development of actin-rich structures. At least to a certain extent, this process happens independently of the non-malignant stroma, although it seems to be impacting the OBs as well. Taken together, we show evidence that even though MF OCs are hyperproliferative, their function is intrinsically supressed due to the inherited neoplastic burden, which in turn contributes to the osteosclerotic dysplasia of the MPN-affected BM.

Disclosures

Verstovsek: Blueprint Medicines Corp: Research Funding; Seattle Genetics: Research Funding; Genentech: Research Funding; Incyte: Research Funding; Galena BioPharma: Research Funding; Bristol Myers Squibb: Research Funding; Bristol Myers Squibb: Research Funding; Celgene: Research Funding; Roche: Research Funding; Pfizer: Research Funding; Lilly Oncology: Research Funding; Astrazeneca: Research Funding; Incyte: Research Funding; Promedior: Research Funding; Genentech: Research Funding; Galena BioPharma: Research Funding; Pfizer: Research Funding; Gilead: Research Funding; NS Pharma: Research Funding; Seattle Genetics: Research Funding; Astrazeneca: Research Funding; Lilly Oncology: Research Funding; Roche: Research Funding; CTI BioPharma Corp: Research Funding; NS Pharma: Research Funding; Blueprint Medicines Corp: Research Funding; Gilead: Research Funding; CTI BioPharma Corp: Research Funding; Celgene: Research Funding; Promedior: Research Funding.

Author notes

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Asterisk with author names denotes non-ASH members.