Abstract

Abstract 287

Purpose:

Farnesyltransferases are key cellular enzymes involved in the prenylation of proteins. Prenylated proteins are important for malignant cell growth. The purpose of this phase II study (NCT00082888) was to assess tumor response and toxicity associated with the oral farnesyltransferase inhibitor tipifarnib (R115777, Johnson and Johnson) in patients with relapsed aggressive, indolent, or uncommon lymphoma. The uncommon group included low incidence lymphoma types such as Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) and T-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma- cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) and peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL).

Patients and Methods:

Patients with relapsed or refractory non-Hodgkin (NHL) or Hodgkin (HL) were eligible if they had measurable disease, performance status ≤2, platelet count ≥75,000 × 10(6)/L, an absolute neutrophil count ≥1000 × 10(6)/L and a creatinine ≤2 × upper limit of normal. Patients initially received tipifarnib 300 mg twice daily, days 1–21 every 28 days. The trial was conducted by the University of Iowa/Mayo Clinic Lymphoma SPORE.

Results:

Ninety-three patients with lymphoma (42 aggressive, 15 indolent, and 36 uncommon) enrolled in the trial between March 2004 and November 2008. The median age was 62 years (range, 18–91). The median number of prior therapies was 5 (range, 1–17). The overall response rate (ORR) was 20% (19/93) with 6% (6/93) complete responses (CR) and 14% (13/93) partial responses (PR). The ORR was 17%, 7%, and 31% for the aggressive, indolent, and uncommon groups, respectively (Table). Among the 19 responders were 7 diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), 7 T-cell NHL, 1 follicular grade II, and 4 HL. The overall median response duration for the 19 responders was 7.5 months (mean, 12.8; range, 1.8 – 48.1 months). The median response duration was 11.3 months (mean, 10.1; range, 1.8 – 18.5 months), 2 months, and 7.5 months (mean, 15.5; range, 1.9 – 48.1 months) for the aggressive (7), indolent (1), and uncommon (11) groups, respectively. Five patients in the uncommon group are still receiving treatment with a range of treatment duration between 25 – 60+ months. Among the 5 still receiving treatment 4 responded and 1 is stable. The range of response duration is 15.4, 17.7, 43.1, and 48.1 months. These five patients (2 with HL, 1 anaplastic large cell cutaneous, and 2 PTCL) are currently receiving doses of 400 (1), 200 (2), and 100 (2) mg twice daily. The median time to progression for all patients was 3.6 months (95% CI: 2.1 – 4.5 months). The grade 3,4 toxicities observed were primarily fatigue (10%) and reversible myelosuppression with 11% anemia, 37% neutropenia, and 32% thrombocytopenia. Correlative studies demonstrated tipifarnib-induced upregulation of Bim, a marker of tipifarnib action in lymphoma cell lines, in 7 of 9 paired lymphoma biopsies.

Disease Typen (%)CRPRORR %
Aggressive Lymphoma Group 42 0 7 17 
    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma 37 (88) 19 
    Mantle cell lymphoma 4 (10) 
    Follicular lymphoma - III 1 (2) 
Indolent Lymphoma Group 15 0 1 7 
    Small lymphocytic lymphoma 5 (33) 
    Extranodal mucosa associated lymphoma 1 (7) 
    Follicular lymphoma-I, II 9 (60) 11 
Uncommon Lymphoma Group 36 6 5 31 
    Hodgkin lymphoma 19 (53) 21 
    T-cell lymphoma - CTCL and PTCL 12 (33) 50 
    Anaplastic large cell lymphoma 5 (14) 20 
Disease Typen (%)CRPRORR %
Aggressive Lymphoma Group 42 0 7 17 
    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma 37 (88) 19 
    Mantle cell lymphoma 4 (10) 
    Follicular lymphoma - III 1 (2) 
Indolent Lymphoma Group 15 0 1 7 
    Small lymphocytic lymphoma 5 (33) 
    Extranodal mucosa associated lymphoma 1 (7) 
    Follicular lymphoma-I, II 9 (60) 11 
Uncommon Lymphoma Group 36 6 5 31 
    Hodgkin lymphoma 19 (53) 21 
    T-cell lymphoma - CTCL and PTCL 12 (33) 50 
    Anaplastic large cell lymphoma 5 (14) 20 
Conclusions:

Tipifarnib has activity in lymphoma, with responses in patients with heavily pretreated DLBCL, HL and T-cell types, but little activity in follicular NHL. This agent has an excellent toxicity profile and targets a novel pathway. Further studies in combination with other agents are warranted for patients with DLBCL, HL or T-cell NHL.

Disclosures:

No relevant conflicts of interest to declare.

Author notes

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Asterisk with author names denotes non-ASH members.