Abstract

Abstract 2555

Erythrpoiesis stimulating agents (ESAs) and the granulocyte hematopoietic growth factors granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) and pegylated G-CSF revolutionized supportive care approaches to anemia and neutropenia, respectively. Thrombopoietin-receptor agonists improve antibody-mediated thrombocytopenia management. For these drugs, as with all agents, a comprehensive understanding of sADRs is important, however, often difficult to do. We reviewed sADRS described in meta-analyses and web-site materials maintained by regulatory agencies and manufacturers reports (1989 to July 2010; n=2,094). Overall, 28 systematic reviews, six package inserts, three medication guides, four FDA Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Systems (REMS) materials, 16 Summaries of Product Characteristics/Product Assessment Reports were included. For ESAs, common sADRs associated with increased relative risks (RRs) included: mortality among cancer patients with chemotherapy-associated anemia or cancer patients not receiving active treatment (RRs: 1.1–1.2); cerebrovascular and cardiovascular events among chronic kidney disease patients ((RRs: 1.3, 1.9), and venous thromboembolism in the cancer setting (RRs;16-1.7). For G-CSF/pegylated-GCSF, rare instances of myelodysplasia/acute myeloid leukemia (MDS/AML) associated with statistically increased RRs were reported among breast cancer patients receiving chemotherapy in trials reported from one NCI-sponsored clinical trials group, one meta-analysis, and one review of Medicare/SEER databases (RR: 1.9–2.1), although the absolute risks were very small (< 2 per 100,000 treated patients). Other rarely reported sADRs (total N < 20) included splenic rupture following G-CSF stimulation of healthy peripheral blood stem donors. Bone marrow fibrosis and collagen deposition were reported with thrombopoietin receptor agonists, although the implications of this finding is uncertain. Also, instances of VTEs were reported among persons who developed high platelet counts following administration of these thrombopoeitin receptor agonists. SADRs are commonly associated with ESA administration in a range of settings, are uncommon occurrences with G-CSF/pegylated G-CSF, and are not well characterized for thrombopoieitin receptor agonists. Formal pharmacovigilance initiatives are ongoing, including FDA mandated REMS with restricted distribution requirement for ESAs in the cancer setting (APPRISE) and the NEXUS and the PROMACTA CARES programs for thrombopoeitin receptor agonists.

  ESAs (Cancer) ESAs (CKD) G-CSF/Pegylated G-CSF 
VTE Mortality Cerebrovascular and CVD AML/MDS 
 RR 1.57 and 1.67 1.10 to 1.17 1.34 and 1.92 2.14 and 1.92 
 95% CI 1.31–1.87 and 1.35–2.06 1.02–1.20 and 1.06–1.30 1.03–1.74 and 1.38–2.26 1.12–4.08 and 1.19–3.07 
Baseline Risk Absolute Risk Common Common Common Rare (2/100,000) 
  ESAs (Cancer) ESAs (CKD) G-CSF/Pegylated G-CSF 
VTE Mortality Cerebrovascular and CVD AML/MDS 
 RR 1.57 and 1.67 1.10 to 1.17 1.34 and 1.92 2.14 and 1.92 
 95% CI 1.31–1.87 and 1.35–2.06 1.02–1.20 and 1.06–1.30 1.03–1.74 and 1.38–2.26 1.12–4.08 and 1.19–3.07 
Baseline Risk Absolute Risk Common Common Common Rare (2/100,000) 

Disclosures:

Bennett:Pfizer: Consultancy.

Author notes

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Asterisk with author names denotes non-ASH members.