Abstract

Abstract 1553

Poster Board I-576

We evaluated survival for all patients diagnosed with Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) in Sweden 1973-2005 (n=6,136; 3,515 men and 2,621 women; median age 40 years). Patients were categorized into six age groups and four calendar periods (1973-1980, 1981-1988, 1989-1996, and 1997-2005). Relative survival ratios (RSRs) were computed as measures of patient survival. Cumulative relative survival improved over time in all age groups with the greatest improvement in patients 51-65 years. Also in patients 66-80 years, significant improvements were recorded in both five- and ten year RSRs. Importantly, a plateau in relative survival was observed after 5 years in patients below ≤ 35 years of age during the last calendar period suggesting a lack of long-term treatment-related mortality. The ten-year RSRs in this calendar period were 0.95, 0.95, 0.92, 0.80, and 0.51 for the age groups 0-18, 19-35, 36-50, 51-65, and 66-80, respectively. Thus, despite this progress, age at diagnosis remains an important predictor of outcome. We also found a significantly better survival for women when adjusted for age and calendar period. During the study period, refined treatment options for patients with limited and advanced-stage HL have contributed to an increasing cure rate. In addition, our findings support that long-term mortality of HL therapy has decreased. Elderly patients still do poorly and targeted treatment options associated with fewer side effects will advance the clinical HL field.

Cumulative relative survival stratified by age at diagnosis and calendar period of diagnosis

Cumulative relative survival stratified by age at diagnosis and calendar period of diagnosis

Disclosures

No relevant conflicts of interest to declare.

Author notes

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Asterisk with author names denotes non-ASH members.