Abstract

Background: Active cancer without or with chemotherapy is associated with a 4- to 6.5-fold increased risk for VTE 11. However, cancer-associated VTE incidence may be under- or overestimated by reports that linked cancer registry data to an anticoagulation clinic database or to hospital discharge diagnosis codes 22,55.

Objective: To estimate the incidence of VTE in active cancer in a well-defined geographic population that includes the full spectrum of VTE events (including rapidly fatal events) occurring in the community.

Methods: Using the longitudinal resources of the Rochester Epidemiology Project and Mayo Clinic Tumor Registry, we identified all Olmsted County, MN residents with incident VTE by review of their complete medical records in the community 66, and all residents with active cancer (by cancer site), over the 28-year period, 1973–2000. Using residents with active cancer within the three months prior or subsequent to incident VTE as the numerator, and all residents with active cancer as the denominator, we estimated the incidence of VTE in active cancer, both overall and for the subsets of pancreatic cancer, brain cancer and lymphoma.

Results: Over 78,236 active-cancer person-years, 595 Olmsted County residents developed incident VTE. The overall active cancer-associated VTE incidence was 760 per 100,000 person-years (95% CI: 701, 824), about 6.5-fold higher than the general population 77. Over 473, 983 and 4,258 pancreatic cancer, brain cancer and lymphoma person-years, respectively, 51, 18 and 46 residents developed incident VTE. The pancreatic cancer-, brain cancer- and lymphoma-associated VTE incidence rates were 10,784 (95% CI: 8029, 14,179), 1,831 (95% CI: 1085, 2,893) and 1,080 (95% CI: 791, 1,441) per 100,000, respectively. Overall, cancer-associated VTE incidence increased with age, and for all ages, men had a higher VTE rate than women. We observed a much higher pancreatic cancer-associated VTE incidence than previously reported.

Conclusions: The incidence of VTE in individuals with active cancer (especially pancreatic cancer) is higher than the general population. The incidence of VTE in patients with pancreatic cancer is higher than previously estimated.

Disclosures: No relevant conflicts of interest to declare.

References:

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