TO THE EDITOR:

Multiple myeloma (MM) constitutes 1.8% of malignancies in the United States, and its incidence is significantly higher among African Americans (AAs) than whites.1,2  Therefore, the impact of race on the disease biology and clinical outcomes of MM is an important area of research.3,4  Recent studies have found significant and increasing racial disparities in overall survival (OS) since the introduction of high-dose and novel agent–based therapies.5-10  Limited access to novel therapies has been considered partly responsible for the lower OS in AAs, and a number of studies have reported such racial disparities in the use of both novel therapies and transplantations.11-17  For example, a SEER data study of 35 842 MM patients reported significantly lower use of novel agents and autologous transplantations specifically in AAs.15  In contrast, data from several smaller studies, including a meta-analysis of clinical trials data, suggest that if access...

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