TO THE EDITOR:

Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD), an inherited immunodeficiency resulting from defects in the reduced NAD phosphate oxidase complex rendering phagocytes deficient in producing the superoxide anion necessary for normal killing of bacterial and fungal microorganisms, leads to severe and recurrent infections, inflammatory granulomatous complications, and autoimmune diseases. It is associated with substantial morbidity and premature death. Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is the only long-term curative therapy; however, historically, utility was limited by high rates of graft failure and transplant-related morbidity and mortality. Transplant survival and graft outcome have improved dramatically over the past 10 years as a result of reduced-toxicity conditioning (RTC) regimens, detailed graft-selection hierarchy, superior HLA-matching technology, better cell-dosed grafts, greater availability of grafts, improved supportive care, and more effective antimicrobial therapy. We studied transplant survival post-HCT for CGD in a supraregional immunology transplant center in...

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